Season’s greetings

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Season’s greetings to all you out there who are vaccinated. The White House would like you to know that you are safe and can go about your business as usual, regardless of breakthrough infections everywhere.

If you’re unvaccinated, no season’s greetings to you. We wish death and destruction, to you, your families, and the hospital system you are surely going to overwhelm for the umpteenth time.

The White House and the President need to work on their messaging.

Might have as well said, “Happy Apocalypse!” or “Merry Death and Destruction!”

That sure makes up for all the missing “mean tweets” we haven’t had in a while. Let’s just make it an official statement direct from the big house.

Seriously.

“We’re the party of inclusion – except for you, you, and your family too.”

Mixed up your messaging much?

Oh, wait, there never was an ACTUAL belief in inclusion unless you follow along, tow the line and not resist. There is room for you in this party…do as we say and you won’t get hurt. Don’t do as we say and we’ll cancel the hell outta ya (even if you’re one of us).

*eye roll*

Happy holidays…and keep your head down.

Theoretical question

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Or questionable theory. Or question and theory. Or I’m insane. Or how many “conspiracies theories” have already come true since March or 2020?

Anyway, can DNA be collected from snot?

How do you collect the DNA of every (or nearly every) living human on the planet?

How do you collect the DNA of people who would normally not willingly give up their DNA?

Theoretical answer?

Virus. Fear. Control. Media. Propaganda. Social “pressure.” More government.

I have no idea what I am talking about, really. I am just sitting here on a slow work day pondering the unponderable. Have you pondered this too?

Weird.

Must endure

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The next three days will be a slog…gotta admit. Why? Well, there is a vacation on the horizon and not checking into work for the better part of nearly two weeks has got me excited.

Thus, I must endure the next several days.

This will be the first real vacation for me in quite some time. The last week of February this year, in fact. There have been days off here and there in between, but this will be the first extended time since then.

Anyway, just thought I would put out there that I am feeling a little “short-timer’s disease” and looking forward to some time off.

Anyone else taking time off during the holidays?

**Interesting note: when you type in “vacation” for the free pictures in Pexel, nearly all the pictures come up as tropical, sunny, and sandy…I must be doing my vacations wrong…**

Zero reaction

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I am pretty good at the poker face. I probably can brag that I have a pretty good RBF too. I can literally make it so people are not sure if I am joking or serious. It’s come in relatively handy in the past.

I admire people who can give no reaction to things that would normally generate a reaction. Today, not so much. I actually found it rather interesting that a joke I told generated next to no reaction, even though it’s a pretty good one.

I sent 10 different friends on Facebook each a different pun, hoping it would possibly help at least one of them to laugh. Unfortunately, no pun in ten did.

I mean, come on! How can you not get a laugh out of someone? How can you not get even an eye roll or a groan? How???

I guess I am not the only person with a poker face. I bet they were laughing inside…

Can you (or did you) keep a straight face?

Lost humanity

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Another trip in the ambulance and another ER visit. This time in a much larger city close by. There was a noticeable difference in care – both in quality and in humanity.

There are and have been a lot of things said about this whole health thing going on – you know, the one that starts with C and ends with D. It has caused a lot of fear and that fear has turned our society into a bunch of people with lost humanity. We have lost what it means to be human and to treat people in a humane way.

We see it all the time with the lockdowns. We see it all the time in the mandates. We see it all the time in masks and shots and the continual testing and the fight for basic medical rights/privacy as they are stripped away. We see it in the denials of service. We see it in the confrontations over restrictions. We see it in pointless rules that actually make things worse rather than helping the people they are supposed to.

Yesterday, I wasn’t allowed into the ER. Barred, with a whole bunch of other people, to sit and wait to see what happens – with little to no communication from the hospital staff. The patient actually had to text me, when able, so I could have updates.

I watched a mother of a severely autistic child argue with hospital staff about accompanying her child. It was obvious of his condition and lack of ability to communicate.

I watched as one of their own hospital nurses (white crocs, scrubs, name tag) struggle to breath while sitting in a wheel chair outside the ER doors. She was alone. She was probably late 20s maybe early 30s. When I mentioned to the lady behind the counter she was struggling, she shrugged and said she was being taken care of.

Obviously, I am frustrated with the treatment of my own loved one. The ER basically did nothing, other than monitor. My loved one said she had never experienced a more unfriendly healthcare experience. The ER doc said that since it didn’t appear to be life-threatening and their job isn’t to diagnose, they were going to release her. Basically, “We can’t help you and we don’t know what’s wrong with you, so get out.”

President Franklin D Roosevelt in his first Inaugural Address said that the “…only thing we have to fear is fear itself…” I has become increasingly clear that Americans have forgotten those words. We have totally and unwisely let fear control us over the last two years and, unfortunately, will probably continue to let fear control us.

Fear has caused us to lose our humanity. It’s a sad state to comment on, but the reality is that we have forgotten what it means to be human and to treat others with empathy and kindness.

This can’t be the way we move forward. We are doomed if that is the case.

Unpleasant chores

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Call me Scrooge, I don’t care. “Bah-humbug,” I say.

Yesterday was the first dry day in a week. The temp also topped out at about 42 degrees. So, of course, the dreaded and despised task of putting up Christmas lights on the house and yard was required.

Ladders. Dead light strings. Hanger things (don’t know what else to call them). Cords everywhere.

Ugh.

It’s done, but I hate the fact that in about a month (probably when it is even colder) I’ll have to take down all that crap and put it away.

There is something about all seasonal d├ęcor that just irks me.

It’s fine for other people. I just could care less about it.

How do you feel about it? Which camp do you fall in – decorate till the cows come home OR Scrooge?

The danger of precedent

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You’re gonna hear about the Supreme Court a lot in the coming days and weeks. They’re hearing a case that could change the course of human events in the U.S. for a long time to come (or not). It really depends on how the court decides the case it heard yesterday, the one about abortion and limiting it.

One of the ways the court makes it’s decisions is based on precedent. Precedent is used to help guide the court in making decisions related to issues of the past. A court obviously can’t really know if a decision they are making in the current day will be used as precedent, but they certainly know in the present when they are using the precedent set by earlier courts.

One of the things about SCOTUS (Supreme Court of the United States) is that it relies heavily on precedents set by previous courts. This is kind of a nod to the fact that those justices have made a correct ruling based on interpretation of the Constitution, intent of the Founders, etc., etc. Therefore, most decisions coming from the court often don’t step on previous decisions and most often don’t overturn precedent.

But, there have been times where that has taken place and it was no small matter.

The best example of a court reversing it’s own precedent (and really the best one to apply now to abortion) is the 1896 case of Plessy vs. Ferguson. The precedent that was set by the court as a result of that case became known as the “separate but equal” doctrine. Essentially it established that, for all intents and purposes, segregation was legal as long as accommodations were equal for both races. Of course, we know the application of that doctrine didn’t really get applied that way and was the basis for all sorts of discriminatory and racist laws. Over and over there challenges to those racist laws and over and over the court upheld decisions in favor of racism simply because the justification was the precedent of Plessy. That precedent would eventually be overturned by a different and later court, which set a new precedent. The 1954 case of Brown vs. The Board of Education turned Plessy on it’s head by deciding in the case that separate was not equal but inherently unequal. Thus, sanctioned and legal racism was stamped out by a future court righting the wrongs of a previous court. There was a new understanding and interpretation and it was decided that the precedent was wrong, so they fixed it and made it right. It took 58 years to make that morally wrong decision, morally right.

Today, some 43 years after the Roe vs. Wade court decision SCOTUS has a chance to right another wrong. A chance to reverse a precedent that has cost millions and millions of human lives – those of unborn children. A chance to stand on what is morally right, saving the lives of babies, instead of standing on what is morally wrong, killing babies. It doesn’t seem like this should be that tough of a decision. But, apparently it is.

Going against public opinion isn’t an easy thing and I am sure it wasn’t that easy in the Brown decision, but it was the right thing to do. Lots of things have changed in 43 years since Roe was decided. Healthcare, medical knowledge, and technology has gotten a lot better in those years, so denying that life starts at conception is backwards as saying the Sun revolves around the Earth.

The arguments from the liberal side of the bench were a little strange yesterday. Sonia Sotomayor is standing on precedent and arguing for maintaining the status quo simple so the court can take on the appearance of legitimacy? Isn’t it less legitimate if it doesn’t correct precedent and right a wrong? To me that seems like a weird argument to make when talking about morally wrong judgements. Can you imagine if the court argued in 1954’s Brown decision that they needed to keep the Plessy precedent to “survive” and remain legitimate?

Anyone else find that strange?

Anyone else care about this topic? What do you think?

Ultimately, precedent can be a positive way to look at pending cases and it can be used as a guide to current issues, but if precedent can’t ever be corrected (despite public opinion) it’s a dangerous thing to stand on.