Urgent Care

Photo by Erik Mclean on Pexels.com

Maybe I should have titled this one, “Urgent” Care. I can’t decide really. All I know is that “urgent” seems to be subjective. Let’s check out a definition and see if it is.

According to Dictionary.com, “urgent” means: compelling or requiring immediate action or attention.

All I know, is that yesterday I took someone to the Urgent Care at a local health clinic and the visit turned into an emergency room visit because the Urgent Care was apparently following some other definition of urgent.

When I checked the individual in, body parts were tingling, breathing was labored, coughing, inhaler didn’t seem to be helping, and there was some dizziness.

The lady behind the counter said an hour and a half wait (there were two other people in the waiting area) but that she would put a “rush” on it (whatever that means). We then watched the two others in the waiting room get taken back and three others from another part of the clinic go back.

Then it turned into a full fledged emergency, as there was now shaking, crying, and a distressed “I can’t breathe.” It was as if all of the sudden paralysis had set in. Couldn’t hold the head up, couldn’t move arms, couldn’t hardly function. The breathing was near panting…

I raced back to where you aren’t supposed to go without escort and yelled for help. People finally started moving. Unfortunately, it was too late. Now the person who probably could have been treated with stronger does of an inhaler needed to take a ride in an ambulance to the ER.

I went from a little worried to full on scared. This is not typical by any means.

Oh, and I’m a lot angry because “urgent” was more like “We’ll get you in when we can.” Really, it shouldn’t be called “Urgent care” at all. It is a walk-in clinic. That’s all it’s ever been.

The ER was pleasant. I mean that tongue & cheek, of course. No one likes to visit that place, especially when you feel it wasn’t necessary in the first place.

Tests. Fluids. Monitoring. Hours.

Of course, they had to administer another covid test (one had already been done earlier in the week and was negative…this one too was negative).

All to find out that it’s viral and there isn’t really anything they can do, other than recommend liquids, rest, ibuprofen, and call the doc if you feel worse again.

Really? So, there was an expensive ride in an ambulance and ER visit for something the doc’s office probably could have told us in the first place? “Urgent” my ass…

Irritating AF.

I’ve decided

Photo by Anna Shvets on Pexels.com

I have decided it is most important for me to protect the dental health of others.

Therefore, I am considering a medical procedure that I hope every other person will also consider. Maybe it should even be government mandated to protect others as well, whether the others have teeth or not.

Anyway, I think if I have all my teeth removed it will keep others from getting cavities. It’s simple, really. If I can’t get cavities, then they shouldn’t be able to get them either.

If we all were to get out teeth removed, well, then no one could get cavities! Gosh, this is such a smart way to ensure dental health and it’s completely practical. It likely would lead to other health improvements too.

Don’t come at me with logic. That doesn’t work these days. It’s practically settled. Besides, logic is overrated. Science says, if you have no teeth, you can’t get cavities. Follow the science.

I can’t wait for this to happen!

Status update

Photo by Mahdi Bafande on Pexels.com

I figure it’s time for a status update for the few real people who actually read this blog. Some of you may care, but I am sure most don’t. There was some question about whether or not I would be able to keep my job after the Mandate BS.

The answer, for now, is yes.

I was able to find a way to use one of the exemption options in good conscious so I applied and was at least verbally approved. I haven’t seen anything written or gotten confirmation about the approval, but was told that they really don’t want anyone to lose their job so they were approving them if applied for.

I said “for now” earlier in the post because who knows what the future holds until the mandate of something stupid comes out. The government has crossed the line (and private companies for that matter) and now the flood gates are opened to other things – just a matter of time. Why include the private companies in that statement, well, the government has opened the door to acceptable forms of discrimination “in the name of health.” (Actually, it isn’t the government so much as it is the people and party running the government[s], but that is a whole different discussion).

So, I am employed in the same place for the foreseeable future. It has, however, opened my eyes to making sure the resume is up to date and making sure that I am keeping my feelers out there to look for something that would maybe allow me to work from home full-time. That would really be ideal, so the job search radar hasn’t shut down completely.

How are you all doing now?

Afternoon drag

Photo by Karolina Grabowska on Pexels.com

I take a late lunch. I take a late lunch on purpose. I most typically take my lunch at 1:00pm so that there is less time at the end of the day. I am off at 4:30pm, so there is 2.5 hours of the work day left when I get back from lunch. But, as of late, I have noticed a problem.

The afternoon is dragging after lunch.

Like. Seriously. Dragging.

That 2.5 hours between the return from lunch and the end of the work day seem just as long as the first 5.5 hours of the day. What’s the deal with that?

There has got to be a reasonable answer for this but I am just not finding it. Instead I spend the afternoon watching the clock and hoping that somehow the end of the day gets there faster than possible in the time/space continuum.

I make coffee.

I go to the bathroom.

I visit co-workers (when I am in the office).

I work on the never ending list of work.

Nothing works.

Why are afternoons so hard? Do you know?