Patience tried

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Ya, know? Waiting sucks. Having patience sometimes can be very difficult.

Had a relative have a pretty major, serious surgery today. The person getting having the surgery has had a difficult decade, it seems, and is rather frail so there was some definite risk involved with this surgery. Information about what was happening was slow, and when it finally came time to hear the results it became unbearably silent.

Like, so silent that when the results of the surgery were supposed to be given there was an hour where no one knew what was going on at all. Everyone waiting for word one way or the other….

Thankfully, the relative made it through and the surgery and is now recovering. There is still some danger, but on the road to hopefully being better.

Silence. Patience. Unknown.

It’s hard to handle at times.

WTH, Doc!?!

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When it comes to your personal health, who should be in charge – you or the doc? Being that you know your body best, should you be the one to make decisions about your own health and if you know something about your body should the doc respect your wishes and do what you have asked even if they disagree? Or, should a doc who may have more knowledge about a subject in general be able to make decisions regarding your health regardless of whether you agree or not?

A meeting with the cardiologist way back in February felt as though the doc wasn’t listening. As a result, an echocardiogram was done (results didn’t show much) and a cardio stress test was scheduled. During the first meeting with the doc, when asked about what kind of stress test it would be, we were told it was going to be a physical (treadmill) test. I specifically asked how much data (time) on the treadmill would be needed since the person likely wouldn’t be able to do more then maybe a minute or two before it would become physically impossible to continue. The doc said there was another option – a chemical stress test – if needed. We said it likely would be.

Much to our dismay, a physical test was scheduled. When asked about it, they said it was the best option.

Today, much to our frustration (and anger, quite frankly) when we showed up for the appointment, because the person needed a assistance to get to the room (a wheelchair) and assistance standing from the wheelchair, the tech wouldn’t do the test because of liability. They were worried they person couldn’t support themselves during the test and because of shortness of breath, the person wouldn’t be able to hold their breath during the echocardiogram to get pictures of the heart. They were going to send a message to the doc that the appointment couldn’t be completed and they sent us on our way.

After waiting for a more than a month for this appointment, there is no progress made on the medical mystery. Still no clue as to why the person is feeling this way.

Which brings me back to the original question – who’s in charge, you or the doc?

It seems these days you are less in control of your health and the decisions are being made by docs (or even insurance). You seemingly get ignored “because we know better” is the attitude.

Should it be this way? Is it supposed to be that way?

Who is the paying customer? Who is providing the service to said paying customer?

Something here is backwards…

Urgent Care

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Maybe I should have titled this one, “Urgent” Care. I can’t decide really. All I know is that “urgent” seems to be subjective. Let’s check out a definition and see if it is.

According to Dictionary.com, “urgent” means: compelling or requiring immediate action or attention.

All I know, is that yesterday I took someone to the Urgent Care at a local health clinic and the visit turned into an emergency room visit because the Urgent Care was apparently following some other definition of urgent.

When I checked the individual in, body parts were tingling, breathing was labored, coughing, inhaler didn’t seem to be helping, and there was some dizziness.

The lady behind the counter said an hour and a half wait (there were two other people in the waiting area) but that she would put a “rush” on it (whatever that means). We then watched the two others in the waiting room get taken back and three others from another part of the clinic go back.

Then it turned into a full fledged emergency, as there was now shaking, crying, and a distressed “I can’t breathe.” It was as if all of the sudden paralysis had set in. Couldn’t hold the head up, couldn’t move arms, couldn’t hardly function. The breathing was near panting…

I raced back to where you aren’t supposed to go without escort and yelled for help. People finally started moving. Unfortunately, it was too late. Now the person who probably could have been treated with stronger does of an inhaler needed to take a ride in an ambulance to the ER.

I went from a little worried to full on scared. This is not typical by any means.

Oh, and I’m a lot angry because “urgent” was more like “We’ll get you in when we can.” Really, it shouldn’t be called “Urgent care” at all. It is a walk-in clinic. That’s all it’s ever been.

The ER was pleasant. I mean that tongue & cheek, of course. No one likes to visit that place, especially when you feel it wasn’t necessary in the first place.

Tests. Fluids. Monitoring. Hours.

Of course, they had to administer another covid test (one had already been done earlier in the week and was negative…this one too was negative).

All to find out that it’s viral and there isn’t really anything they can do, other than recommend liquids, rest, ibuprofen, and call the doc if you feel worse again.

Really? So, there was an expensive ride in an ambulance and ER visit for something the doc’s office probably could have told us in the first place? “Urgent” my ass…

Irritating AF.

Water is boring

clean clear cold drink

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What’s with water anyway?

Why is it so tasteless? Yes, I know that is a generalization and all water has a little something (chemicals/minerals/etc) that give it a “taste,” but it isn’t really a taste at the same time.

Drink more water they say…

OK, can you make it taste better without me going through the effort of adding something too it? It is just too much work. How about it just come out of the tap or, better yet, the dispenser in the fridge with some flavor?

Damn, I should patent this idea immediately! Soda machines let you choose the flavor of soda (who knew there were 435 *exaggeration* different flavors of Coke?), so why can’t my fridge do the same thing (some on Samsung, innovate that! I want credit though)? I press a button and the water that fills my bottle has a hint of lemon or a hint of lime or a hint of blackberry or a hint of mint (ewww) or a hint of fruit punch or whatever you think would be nice.

Make it happen people!

Otherwise, plain water is boring and I don’t want to drink it. But I do, reluctantly and begrudgingly.