I can do without

beautiful bloom blooming blossom

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There is an old saying out there…”April showers bring May flowers.”

Yeah, I could do without the flowers. Just saying.

Wet, wet, and more wet.

Does it rain a lot in Washington? That is a question I get a lot when I travel and people find out where I am from. Yes. It rains a lot.

I don’t need flowers. I don’t even really need May.

Let’s just get to summer already.

Like mowing rocks

douglas-fir-cones_1024x1024

Up here in the PNW we have trees. Lots of them. They’re everywhere. Well, mostly everywhere. There are places that have a shortage of trees, but don’t feel sorry for them. Feel sorry for me. Please. Like right now. Feel it.

Right now I would like to cut down all my trees. I don’t really need them and I don’t really have a use for them. They’re really more of a pain really.

I think I have talked about one aspect of the pain on the blog already, pine needles. I think I also mentioned in another post about trees and their freaking leaves falling in the yard too. BUT there is another aspect of pain that I haven’t yet mentioned when it comes to my trees.

Pine cones.

No, not the great big ones with pokey things on them that smell like cinnamon that you can buy at Michael’s or Hobby Lobby or JoAnn Fabrics during Christmas time. While I am sure those are an issue for someone somewhere, they aren’t my issue.

My pine cones are from the Douglas Fir trees in the yard. (see the photo at the top) These stupid trees produce (seemingly) millions of pine cones every year and then during the winter months they shed them all over my freaking yard. When spring comes and it is time to mow the yard, these pine cones are in varying degrees of opening (so some are “soft” – meaning opened, and some are hard as rocks because they are wet and closed).

It takes time to pick these things up, bent over for hours scouring the ground to find them all (used to bride the kids to do it for money – one year they picked up 40 gallons [8 5-gallon buckets] of them). The kids are old enough now they aren’t going to fall for Dollar Store trinkets any longer.

So, rather than pick them up this year, I just decided to try and mow over them. Oh man the racket!! It was like mowing rocks.

So, between the pine needles and pine cones and sap from some of the trees, and falling leaves from some of the other trees, and moss all over the yard – yeah, this place is a modern day paradise for landscaping nightmares.

#smh

Blink of an eye

lioness lying on brown tree trunk

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It was nice here in the Pacific Northwest this weekend. It got up into the 60s and there were lots of people out without coats and washing their cars. I happen to have been one of them!

When the weather turns nice (and yes, in the NW 60s is nice) it is time to get out and work in the yard, getting ready for Spring. So, the weekend was a weekend to get off the couch and cast away the sluggish attitude to “get ‘r done!”

Well, I got her done. And I am paying for it this morning. All that activity made this old guy stiff and tired.

You know that feeling when your tired and you just want to stay in bed? Yeah, I got that this morning, but really the issue here today is that time that goes by in the blink of an eye.

Literally, as I was driving to work this morning, I think I could count the seconds go by with each blink of the eye. There was literally time in each blink to think, “It feels good to close my eyes. Wait, I’m driving, open back up.” Then the next blink comes, “Why did I get out of bed? Do I really have to do this?” The next blink, “It would be nice to just leave them closed. Why are they so heavy? Open, open, open…” And so on…It was a really long drive to work this morning.

Anyway, here’s to a slow-brained, slow-blinking kind of day…oh Monday…

Stir the crazy

a man holds an old worn axe

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In the PNW, we have had cold and snow and ice. Reality check = it doesn’t look like it will let up any time soon. The overnight lows are high teens and daytime highs are mid thirties. Yes, I realize those aren’t polar vortex numbers, but for our area this is cold and it doesn’t usually last this long, nor does it give the prospect of lasting long.

Anyway, my job affords me the opportunity to telecommute (you know this already) and I have taken advantage of that since driving with stupid people (more so than typical days) isn’t my thing (I’ve mentioned this already this week too).

That being said, I think I might be going a bit stir crazy. Cabin Fever. “All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy,” kind of crazy. I haven’t left the house since Sunday evening. My interaction with others has been limited to those in the house and those I can communicate with at work, via Skype, Zoom, text, and email.

While I haven’t hacked my way through a door with an ax, yet, I think I will venture out this afternoon and try some human interaction before the next wave of snow and ice comes this weekend.

Moss knows no bounds

Well, except for a rolling stone, supposedly. If you are familiar with the quote, then that will make sense. Otherwise, it won’t. Anyway, I think here in the Pacific Northwest moss would give that rolling stone a challenge, for sure.

Moss is everywhere. In the trees. In the grass. In the shade. In the sun. On the roof. On the sidewalks. In the driveway. On the windows. Dare I say, even some have it on their cars. Hanging low. Hanging high. It is freaking EVERYWHERE!

A couple years ago I tried to kill the stuff in my lawn. Guess what? Yes, it died briefly. Along with the grass that was barely hanging on because of it. Then it came back in the fall, thicker and more robust, like it was just taking a breath before it decided to take over the rest of the yard. So, I gave up. I am just letting it take over the lawn…I mean it’s green, it’s soft, and it needs to be mowed less often than real grass…

The war on moss is not over, but the battles have certainly no gone in my favor. I will continue to battle, right after I take a nap on that soft stuff in the shade.