Perspective

man in brown leather jacket using binoculars

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio on Pexels.com

There is an astounding lack of perspective in the United States these days.

The lack of understanding of history is a perspective that continues to grow.

A former student who posted on Instagram that her celebrating the 4th of July without a care in the world was “privilege” because it doesn’t represent everyone…is missing that perspective and it kind of surprised me.

Well, it does and it doesn’t. She, of course, is a college graduate who has been subjected to liberal brainwashing that demonizes everything American in our higher ed institutions these days. Wanna talk about a pandemic? How about the one in our nation’s colleges and the fact that there is no room for open discussion about different perspectives?

I am seeing this kind of stuff from a lot of my former students. I can safely say they came from a rather liberal, small community, but one that is not unpatriotic. These students weren’t that way when they were in high school.

When these kids were in my class, we did cover Frederick Douglass’s “What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?”. We read it, analyzed it. Discussed it. Drew some perspective from it and to it.

Douglass’s words rang true in 1852. There were many people still in the bonds of slavery and were not given the opportunities and freedoms that the Declaration of Independence and Constitution guaranteed to Americans. However, that is not the case in 2020. There is not slavery in the US (at least not the kind that Douglass was talking about) and opportunity is open to all. Freedom is given to all. Blessings of those historical documents are available and enjoyed by all.

Have we formed that “more perfect union” yet? Nope.

Are we striving still, to get there? Of course.

But to say that your “privilege” to celebrate the 4th of July negates what our Founding Fathers and those all along the history of our country have done for us is rather short sighted. Progress, moving forward, celebrating success, and contemplating failure (and learning from it) is the American way.

Historical knowledge is important. There are a lot of people who are getting it wrong these days.

Sponsorship

abundance achievement bank banknotes

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Sponsorship is a weird thing.

No, I haven’t been sponsored yet, but if you would like to, just leave me a note in the comments and I’ll follow up.

Anyway, on my trip last week I was at the Phoenix Suns game and I noticed in lots of different places that they had things going on around the arena that were sponsored by a college. Northern Arizona University, to be specific.

To be clear, I know nothing about this college. I don’t really care to know anything about this particular school. But, what I do know of colleges in general is that they are expensive – usually for no good reason other than they are trying to make a profit (even the supposed “non-profit” schools).

Therein lies the rub for me.

Sponsorships are usually something that has to be paid up front so you can have your name plastered all over the event, product, or other whatever. So, the way I see it is that this school sponsored events at a professional sports game and arena so that it could be noticed and maybe more students would enroll there. One can only assume at this point then is that the school is jacking up tuition and fees so that it can pay for official sponsorships at high profile locations like professional sports teams and arenas, which by the way don’t really need any help with promotions.

Why is college expensive? One of the many reasons is because of unnecessary crap like this. I highly doubt they can show that promotions at this venue have generated sufficient enrollments to cover the cost of the sponsorship.

Colleges shouldn’t be allowed to do sponsorships, period.

Tell me I’m wrong. Well, try to anyway.