One, other, or all?

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Sometimes the choices about a how you use your time and the entertainment that you consume is tough. There are so many different options these days. From the extremely varied different video streaming services, to all the music streaming platforms, to all the options for books (real, audio, digital), podcasts, and social media.

It literally is difficult to keep up with all the options. Like literally.

I like movies and TV.

I like audio books.

I like listening to music.

I like listening to a couple different podcasts.

So, the question is, how do I do it all? Do I need a schedule? How do I give them all their due audience? Seriously.

I like music to fill time while I am putzing. I like to listen to podcasts and audio books while I putz. I listen to music while I work.

I like to watch stuff, but I actually watch – I can’t just listen. That takes time.

So, how do I watch my shows and movies, listen to audio books and podcasts, and how do I listen to all the music?

Are you like me? Do you do all this stuff or do you just focus on one? How do you deal with all this entertainment and balance it, like to keep up with it?

Rockstar

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Why is this song so popular?

Sure it has a great beat. Sure it a some catchy phrases in it. BUT, it wasn’t until I looked up the lyrics that I really understood what the song was about. It’s really kind of disgusting and shouldn’t be popular. It should actually make people angry, and there apparently isn’t any. Where is the outrage over this stuff?

Violence? Check. N-word? Check. Gangsta persona? Check.

“Rockstar” by DaBaby and Roddy Ricch is perpetuating exactly what is wrong in rap music. That music translates to what plays out in the communities that listen to it. Glorifying exactly what went on in major cities all over the country.

Over the holiday weekend, more violence. Could this song be a contributor? Hard to say for sure, obviously, but you can bet there are people out there listening to it and romanticizing the violence and behavior it talks about.

Why do radio stations place this stuff? Why aren’t people holding them accountable for playing music that glorifies violence, murder, drugs, gangsters, etc.? Better yet, why aren’t artists holding other artists accountable for writing about and singing about this stuff?

Perhaps the artists and their music really isn’t about building up a community, or a culture, so much as it is about exploiting it. Perhaps the artists don’t really care about the message that has been played over and over in the media. Just as long as they get theirs and can take it to the bank, right?

That’s irresponsible. That’s hypocrisy. That’s exploitation.

 

Musically debatable

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The music industry is rather strange when it comes to censorship, or self-censorship.

One country group, Lady Antebellum, has decided that it’s name needs to be changed because of the offense it may cause. So they have now officially decided to go by Lady A instead their original name.

OK, I get it. That is their right and they are certainly being sensitive to the times and their fans (or potential fans). For them, it makes sense and I certainly won’t stop listening to them when they come on the radio because they decided to change their name.

The interesting thing about the music industry is that they seem to have a double standard when it comes to language. Musicians are now using explicit language in their music a lot more often than they used to.

It’s a strange trend, really, with the rise of streaming services and ways to get music delivered to you without having to purchase something the entire general public might listen to.

Regular old radio broadcasts never had such language or it was “bleeped” out. CDs eventually had the “explicit” label on the cover so people knew what they were buying. Streaming services today even let you filter your music so that you don’t have to play explicit songs on the stations you are listening to. All perfect examples of ways to make sure the public gets the music they want without having to listen to things they don’t want.

WHAT I DON’T GET

What I don’t get is how the music industry continues to allow artists to publish and distribute music with the N-WORD in it.

How is this still a thing if there is such a debate about the use of the word?

If nearly everyone finds it offensive and people are being publicly tarred and feathered on social media if they have ever uttered the word at some point in their past, then how are current artists still allowed to use it?

Certain genres even seem to thrive on the use of the N-WORD.

I’m not talking about artists from last decade or several decades ago (though they still seem to use it also). I am talking about current household names, modern, up-to-date, people who in certain settings object to the use of the word and then turn around and use it in their own music. Double standard much?

Why aren’t music studios taking a stand on this? Why aren’t streaming services taking a stand on this? Why aren’t artists calling out other artists for the use of the N-WORD? Why does the music industry continue to perpetuate the use of the word by continuing to allow it? Is it offensive or not?

Don’t even get into the whole “freedom of expression” or “artist’s voice” arguments. We all know of instances where freedom of expression has been suppressed and publicly shamed for a myriad of circumstances, so that doesn’t really apply. Right? Or is there a double standard in the music industry?

This is a subject I guess I’ll never understand.

 

 

Freeloading

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You know that song by Tom Petty called “Free Fallin'”? In case you aren’t familiar with it, you can see and hear it here.

It’s a good song. Catchy and all.

However, someone is missing the boat by not rewriting the lyrics to “Free loadin'”. I am sure it would be a huge money maker. Ok, maybe not huge but it probably would make some. I am not that musically inclined, or poetic, so I am not sure I can do it. There has to be someone with a gift for this sort of thing.

Why, you ask? Well, because we live in a society that has a whole bunch of people who are free loadin’ off of the rest of us and it kind gets a little irritating. Those free loaders should have a theme song. At least we would know what they were really up to or we could see them coming before they get here.

Oh, and while we’re at it, it looks like the 2020 presidential race is going to have a few people running for the office that could also use the song as their campaign theme song as they promise to give people everything for nothing. A whole society of free loadin’! Good golly, Miss Molly, won’t that be a utopia worth singing about?

Perhaps Tom, if he were still around, could be convinced to rewrite it himself.

Maybe he would be into that sort of thing, social commentary and economic systems. Seems like a hit to me.


What other songs do you think could be rewritten so that it more accurately reflected the current events?

Can’t hear you

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We are an entertainment society, as in we all want to be entertained all the time. Look at our culture. We carry around computers in our hands that are used for some communication, but mostly for entertainment.

It comes in various forms, but usually there is some kind of entertainment even when you go out to eat. TVs on the wall. Touch pads of some sort on the table. Music playing overhead. A live band. You are likely to find at least one of these forms of entertainment in a dining establishment near you.

The other day I was out to eat at a place and the music was so loud (not a band, just overhead) that I couldn’t talk with the person across the table from me. It felt like we had to shout at each other just to tell the other person we couldn’t hear what they were saying because of the music.

We probably should have left, but instead endured the abuse of our ears while we ate.

Maybe I am just getting old, though I don’t think it is that. I like loud music, but there is a time and place for it. When it comes to being social with others I don’t think music blaring is an appropriate time to give the speakers a workout. Most people like to visit while they eat.

So, is this becoming common practice these days? I noticed a while back while out with my family as well, though it wasn’t as bad as the last place it was still rather annoying.


Friends, what do you know about this? Are you similarly annoyed by the rising volume of music in restaurants?

Music and explicit lyrics

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What is the deal with music and explicit lyrics these days? It seems as though, as a listener, it is becoming harder and harder to avoid. If you look at the top 50 on iTunes and on Amazon (“Best of What’s New to Prime”), at least 30% of the music has the [Explicit] tag with the title. So what gives?

Why does an artist feel the need to express themselves this way? Yes, I know about the whole Freedom of Speech thing, but that isn’t really the issue. The issue is the fact that the explicit lyrics aren’t necessary. It doesn’t improve the song. It doesn’t make the message of the song more meaningful. Music sold without the inclusion of such language in the past and music did well without it.

Perhaps it is just a genre thing? Maybe. I looked at the “50 Great Modern Country Songs” on Amazon music and there was only ONE with explicit language in it. Interesting.

All I know is that it is irritating to me. It perhaps should be irritating to you as well.