Delayed

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This post is officially brought to you by road construction delays.

It isn’t a sponsored post, but should be.

Road construction on my commute route that was supposed to completed by 5am this morning wasn’t done at the appointed time. This is on a major North/South interstate highway, mind you. Three lanes reduced to one. When I finally went past the choke point, the newly laid asphalt was still steaming. So, the delay was going to be at least another hour.

So, you know, just by that description, that you are going to get thousands of commuters and travelers who are going to get stuck in that backup. It took me 45 minutes to get through a section of roadway that normally takes less than a minute at highway speed.

I knew about the construction, but figured I would be going through the area almost two hours after the supposed wrap-up. No problem, right? Not so much.

So, my question is…do these construction companies get fined for not getting things done at the appointed and planned times? I mean this delay caused me (and I am sure thousands more) late for work. That’s lost time, lost production. So who pays for that?

Who answers and how for these sorts of things?

Where ya’ll going?

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It seems more of you, many more than usual, are going somewhere today.

It’s a Tuesday. Where could you possibly be going? I mean, yes, I have gotten to know those of you who take the route daily…I mean, I see you every day but I don’t really know you.

However, today, there were a bunch of people I didn’t know and you were all in the way. Traffic kept moving, which is good, but it was way slower than usual because there were so many of you.

If ya’ll could stay off my roads, especially my commute route, that would be great…

Guest WiFi – exercise in frustration

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This is a love-hate type relationship.

Have you ever been in a store and unable to get a cell signal? Yeah, it happens more than you think. Have you been in such a store only to find there is no “Guest Wifi” available to you? Irritating. I find this most irritating while shopping at Costco. I mean, come on, it’s a warehouse for crying out-loud. It wouldn’t be that hard to put wifi in the place.

On the other hand, there are those places that have “Guest WiFi” available but it doesn’t work or is slower than molasses (here’s one for you…electronics store Best Buy has spotty guest wifi). I was traveling recently and learned that there was a place nearby (a government agency, actually) that had guest wifi. So, I went to check it out. FULL signal, this is promising! However, no data transferred at all. It was basically the same as when you’re at home and you know the wifi is on and you get a signal but it has to be rebooted so it will allow the transfer of data. So, what was promising became just an exercise in frustration.

So, we are left with the love-hate relationship again. I love stores that make it available, but I hate places that have it and it doesn’t work.

 

Off the grid

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So I have been camping this week. I am sure it has been relaxing, but I can’t say for sure because I am writing this post ahead of time…like I did for all these posts this week.

When you are “off the grid” there is a certain kind of freedom because you aren’t faced with the rush of trying to keep up on everything that goes on around you. The outside world doesn’t interfere with the “here and now.”

But, there is also a downside to that. Once you have been off the grid for a few days, you start to feel the addiction of the grid. What’s going on? What are others doing? Is the world falling apart without me? It is really tough to unplug and “just be” because the internet and electronics are so imbedded in our lives.

Off the grid vacations are great, but I’d be lying if I said I didn’t dread them a little too.

 

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Vacation planning

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There is a reason teachers would rather go to work sick, or skip all professional development. It’s because it is more work than it is worth. Planning takes time and effort and more times than not there is more work to do when you get back. It is just easier to be there than to not be there.

Now that I am not in the classroom, I think I have found the regular working stiff equivalent.

I now understand why Americans would rather work and accrue vacation days rather than actually go on vacation.

Why is using vacation and taking a vacation so much work?

Steps to taking a vacation:

  1. Plan when to go on vacation MONTHS (if not years) in advance.
  2. Save your butt off for vacation (or rack up CC bills while on vacation so you can work your butt off when you return).
  3. Ask for time off and cross your fingers someone didn’t beat you to the dates.
  4. Plan where to go or what to do…this couldn’t probably be 10 mores steps by itself but for demonstration purposes, I’ll keep it at one.
  5. Arrange for pet-sitter/house-sitter/rides to or from airport.
  6. Shop for vacation.
  7. Pack for vacation.
  8. Load up the car.
  9. Worry about forgetting something while you drive away.
  10. Unload the car.
  11. Hustle off to destination.
  12. Unpack when you get to destination.
  13. Do stuff. See stuff. Eat stuff. Drink stuff. Repeat.
  14. Pack to go home.
  15. Load the car.
  16. Worry about forgetting something at the place you just left.
  17. Travel.
  18. Get back home.
  19. Unpack.
  20. Do laundry from vacation (and perhaps a house-sitter).
  21. Catch up on mail.
  22. Catch up on yard work.

Return to work exhausted.

Is vacation really worth the trouble?


Anyone else ever feel like this? Ever needed a vacation from your vacation?

On the horizon

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The longest week known to man is the week before a vacation.

The days drag.

The nights are filled with planning and preparation.

Vacation is on the horizon but there is so much to do beforehand.

While at work the only thing you can think of is what you would rather be doing during the vacation week to follow.

It’s as if vacation is but a mirage in the desert right now. Is it real? Will it provide relief and rest? Is refreshment ahead?

I can see it. I can almost touch it…and yet the horizon feels so far off.


How do you make it through the week before a vacation? Do you have a strategy to deal with the anticipation and distraction?

The long road home

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I was returning home last night after dropping my daughter off with her mom.

I knew I was gonna have to take the long road home since the highway in the opposite direction (my usual return route) was backed up because of road construction. It was clearly visible from the other side of the highway that the construction workers had closed one of the two lanes that was supposed to be open to keep traffic moving (it was in the plans to keep two lanes open at all times, posted on WSDOT website). Looks like that wasn’t the case after all.

Anyway, knowing this in advance, I took the long way around.

I found it rather interesting that the people who set up the detour route left a little bit to be desired with the route. I have navigation and already had a fairly good idea around the backup, but it was odd that the detour round ended in the middle of nowhere. It just stopped. I knew where to go from there, but someone who was not familiar of the area would have had no clue what to do next when the “Detour End” sign came up. Seems someone may have run out of signs and just decided to end the route because there were at least two more turns on the route to be back to where someone would have started normally.

I guess with navigation you are really never lost.

Take the long road home once in a while. You might see something you didn’t expect. Plus, do you really need to be in a hurry all the time?