WTH, Doc!?!

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When it comes to your personal health, who should be in charge – you or the doc? Being that you know your body best, should you be the one to make decisions about your own health and if you know something about your body should the doc respect your wishes and do what you have asked even if they disagree? Or, should a doc who may have more knowledge about a subject in general be able to make decisions regarding your health regardless of whether you agree or not?

A meeting with the cardiologist way back in February felt as though the doc wasn’t listening. As a result, an echocardiogram was done (results didn’t show much) and a cardio stress test was scheduled. During the first meeting with the doc, when asked about what kind of stress test it would be, we were told it was going to be a physical (treadmill) test. I specifically asked how much data (time) on the treadmill would be needed since the person likely wouldn’t be able to do more then maybe a minute or two before it would become physically impossible to continue. The doc said there was another option – a chemical stress test – if needed. We said it likely would be.

Much to our dismay, a physical test was scheduled. When asked about it, they said it was the best option.

Today, much to our frustration (and anger, quite frankly) when we showed up for the appointment, because the person needed a assistance to get to the room (a wheelchair) and assistance standing from the wheelchair, the tech wouldn’t do the test because of liability. They were worried they person couldn’t support themselves during the test and because of shortness of breath, the person wouldn’t be able to hold their breath during the echocardiogram to get pictures of the heart. They were going to send a message to the doc that the appointment couldn’t be completed and they sent us on our way.

After waiting for a more than a month for this appointment, there is no progress made on the medical mystery. Still no clue as to why the person is feeling this way.

Which brings me back to the original question – who’s in charge, you or the doc?

It seems these days you are less in control of your health and the decisions are being made by docs (or even insurance). You seemingly get ignored “because we know better” is the attitude.

Should it be this way? Is it supposed to be that way?

Who is the paying customer? Who is providing the service to said paying customer?

Something here is backwards…

Lost humanity

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Another trip in the ambulance and another ER visit. This time in a much larger city close by. There was a noticeable difference in care – both in quality and in humanity.

There are and have been a lot of things said about this whole health thing going on – you know, the one that starts with C and ends with D. It has caused a lot of fear and that fear has turned our society into a bunch of people with lost humanity. We have lost what it means to be human and to treat people in a humane way.

We see it all the time with the lockdowns. We see it all the time in the mandates. We see it all the time in masks and shots and the continual testing and the fight for basic medical rights/privacy as they are stripped away. We see it in the denials of service. We see it in the confrontations over restrictions. We see it in pointless rules that actually make things worse rather than helping the people they are supposed to.

Yesterday, I wasn’t allowed into the ER. Barred, with a whole bunch of other people, to sit and wait to see what happens – with little to no communication from the hospital staff. The patient actually had to text me, when able, so I could have updates.

I watched a mother of a severely autistic child argue with hospital staff about accompanying her child. It was obvious of his condition and lack of ability to communicate.

I watched as one of their own hospital nurses (white crocs, scrubs, name tag) struggle to breath while sitting in a wheel chair outside the ER doors. She was alone. She was probably late 20s maybe early 30s. When I mentioned to the lady behind the counter she was struggling, she shrugged and said she was being taken care of.

Obviously, I am frustrated with the treatment of my own loved one. The ER basically did nothing, other than monitor. My loved one said she had never experienced a more unfriendly healthcare experience. The ER doc said that since it didn’t appear to be life-threatening and their job isn’t to diagnose, they were going to release her. Basically, “We can’t help you and we don’t know what’s wrong with you, so get out.”

President Franklin D Roosevelt in his first Inaugural Address said that the “…only thing we have to fear is fear itself…” I has become increasingly clear that Americans have forgotten those words. We have totally and unwisely let fear control us over the last two years and, unfortunately, will probably continue to let fear control us.

Fear has caused us to lose our humanity. It’s a sad state to comment on, but the reality is that we have forgotten what it means to be human and to treat others with empathy and kindness.

This can’t be the way we move forward. We are doomed if that is the case.

Walk-in

computer desk laptop stethoscope

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Wish me luck. I’ll probably need it.

I am headed to the walk-in clinic early this afternoon to see if there is anything they can do about the sinuses and deep lung coughing. Sleep last night was tough to come by and with a vacation coming in less than a week I am looking to kick this thing rather quickly.

Why do I need luck? Have you been to a walk-in? LOL

It takes a demonstration of extreme patience and tolerance.

It takes forever (typically) to get seen by a doc and, when you actually do see a doc it typically isn’t even a doc but a PA (physician’s assistant). I have found that care is a little suspect at that point. Plus, add in that a walk-in generally tries to rush you out once you’re in (it seems to take forever to see anyone and then once you do, you wonder why it took so long based on how long you actually got to see someone).

So, I am going to be brave and endure with the hope of some relief.

Doctor doctor

computer desk laptop stethoscope

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Is it getting near impossible to get good service at a doctor’s office any more?

I was reminiscing the other day about how when you used to go to the doctor that they would actually spend some time with you and actually show concern for you, not just your physical self but for other aspects of your life.

Those times are gone. Long gone.

Now, when you go to the doctor, you barely get 10 minutes with the doc and you only get “one thing at a time.” In other words, if I am visiting the doctor for one physical ailment I can’t also mention a different ailment. I am told that I will have to make another appointment for that. Really?

Heaven forbid that I take more time than my allotted 10 minutes!

Doctor’s offices have become all about production rather than quality and patients are feeling the effects. Its all about “How many patients can I see in a day?” rather than “I am going to do the best job possible for my patients so their care and health comes first.”

A relative recently visited the doc and was going because they were pretty sure they had a sinus infection but also something else is going on internally, like in the stomach or kidney area. Unsure of what is going on in one area but pretty positive in another, they hoped they could have both addressed in the same visit. At first they were told that another appointment would be needed. When it was brought up again with the nurse, the response was “I’ll see if the doctor has time.” The doctor “made time” and broke their policy to talk about the second issue without a second visit…only to have my relative go back to the doctor two days later because the second issue is getting worse.

Is that really care? Is that really best healthcare we can get? “If there is time…” ” I am not supposed to do this…” “We’ll try and squeeze you in…” Whatever.

Your life, your well-being, your health is at risk because our doctors (maybe not them, but whoever is making the money and holding the docs hostage) can’t time time to actually provide you with the care you need.

I am not really sure what the answer is, but I certainly know what the answer isn’t. It’s not the kind of care we are getting now.

“The good ol’ days” really were better when it comes to doctor office visits. Let’s put some personal level of care back into “healthcare.”


 

Do you miss the “Good ol’ days” of healthcare too?